Truth of the Japanese-Korean Annexation Era

 Truth of the Japanese-Korean Annexation Era

-there was once a time when Japan and Korea joined hands-

My parents told me “The Japanese were very kind”

Currently in Japan, there are sad rumors going around, confusing many people. For example, “The Japanese once invaded the Korean peninsula, and oppressed, tortured, and exploited, and did many other atrocities against the Koreans” is one of them. Some of us may have even been taught that in school, as if it is the truth. Some of us were taught that the Japanese were evil during the War. However, in order to determine if this is true or false, we must turn and listen to our elders who lived and experienced those times.

There is a Korean woman named Sung Hua Oh. She has published many books on the Japanese-Korean relations and she has grown up being told by her parents that “the Japanese were very kind people.”

However, when she started going to school, the teachers taught them that “the Japanese did terrible things to the Korean people”. She was heavily educated throughout her school life of anti-Japanese ideals. As she grew up, she was forced into thinking that the Japanese did horrible things to the Korean people, as her teachers at school educated her.

Sung Hua later visited Japan and lived there for awhile. While she was living in Japan, she soon started to remember her parents words that the Japanese are very kind people.

After her temporary stay in Japan, she re-studied the history between Japan and Korea. She soon discovered that the anti-Japanese education she received at school was very biased and was far from the truth. This is how she liberated herself from the Anti-Japanese principle.  She later published a book called, “The Japanese occupation era for the consumers”(Sanko publishing Inc.). This book was based on interviews of the people, both Korean and Japanese, who lived and experienced the Japanese occupation era (1910 to 1945).

In this book, 15 Korean and Japanese people who experienced the Japanese occupation era of the Korean peninsula were recorded. All of them were of elderly age. All of them gave precious testimonies. Through their experience, Sung Hua was able to obtain a clear vision of how things were during the Japanese occupation of the Korean peninsula.

Let us turn a willing ear towards their testimonies…

The Testimonies of the people who experienced the Japanese Occupation of Korea

Motoshi Abe moved to the Korean peninsula when he was the age 3 in 1920 and lived their as a student. He is one of the few living that experienced the Japanese occupation era of the Korean peninsula.

“When I was in Korea, I have never heard, even rumors, of Japanese people bullying the Korean people”. Especially when I lived in Suwon, there weren’t a lot of Japanese people, so the people of Suwon were very kind. At least in Suwon, I have never seen or heard of any conflicts between the Japanese and Korean people. Even in school, we were taught that we were visitors; so we are not allowed to bully or fight with the Korean people.” Even my parents strictly told us not to bully the Korean people. My father was a doctor and he helped the poor. He later became infected by the typhoid and dysentery and had to leave Suwon. When he was ordered to leave Suwon, the people of Suwon came to our house and pleaded with tears for us to stay. After the War, I returned to Japan I began to hear stories of the oppression by the Japanese towards the Koreans. I had no idea where these stories came from and from my experience, it was all nonsense. Speaking from my own experience, I can say with confidence that there was no oppression, not even bullying or prejudice between the common consumers.

As Mr. Abe stated in his testimony, there were no conflicts between the common Japanese folk and Koreans. Today, in Korean schools,

“Imperial Japan invaded Korea and they oppressed and exploited the Koreans all over the peninsula.” “We Korean who suffered the oppression by the Japanese, fought for our liberation and freedom.” These are things that are taught in Korean schools. If one is educated with this, they will be forced to think that the Japanese were like gangsters; they oppressed the Korean people and this lead to the destruction of the Japanese-Korean relationship. However, if you ask anyone who lived and experienced that era, one can see that the truth is a lot different.

Another example is the testimony by Kenichi Hayashi, born and raised in Shinui Province (Present day norther region of North Korea):

“There were no cases of the Japanese being prejudice towards the Koreans. The students were completely equal; there were times when a Korean senior student would call a Japanese junior student and tell him that his school uniform was crooked and fix it for him. I never thought of wanting to leave Korean and return to Japan. It was very comfortable living in Korea, and I was happy. If I were asked where I would like to be buried after my death, I would have answered, Korea/”

Tae Yoshida, who spent her childhood in Korea during the Japanese occupation, testifies:

“I played among the local children. I loved the long hair of the Korean girls and always asked them if I could touch it. They always let me. There were no barriers between us. I only have memories of having fun together. I have never seen or even heard of cases where Koreans were bullied by Japanese people. The security of Korea was very good; I’ve never heard of any burglars or thieves in our district. There was absolutely no violence. When we had to return to Japan, nobody tried to steal our furniture; we gave it to our friends. They were really happy and expressed their gratitude to us. I was very proud to have friends like them. It is said that the Koreans were forced to change their name and have Japanese names; however, everyone around me kept their Korean names and no one was forced to have Japanese names. Regarding the things that are said after the War, I think there is a lot of false information. I was born in Seoul and lived in Seoul until I was an adult and I think we should be proud that the Japanese and Koreans lived together happily during those times.

The Koreans and Japanese were living happily

A Korean man named Sung Bok Park who experienced the Japanese occupation testifies:

“At school, we were never discriminated by Japanese students or teachers. Even now, when I meet with my former Japanese classmates, they want to speak Korean with me. There are many former Japanese classmates that I am still in contact with.

There were two teachers from my commercial high school that I respect very much. One of them was Mr. Matsuo. He was the Japanese language teacher. He was a teacher respected by both the Japanese and Korean students. The other one was Mr. Yoko. He was not popular among the Japanese students; he was very strict and was not tolerant when the students did something bad. However, he was very kind to me and I consulted him various times.

After graduation, I worked at a Japanese bank; even there, I never experienced any discrimination. We went on family vacations with my Japanese colleagues. There were no barriers between us; Japanese and Koreans were living together happily.

One might argue that this was impossible during those times but excluding the extremists, there were no conflicts between the Korean and Japanese people. I have never seen or heard any cases of conflict, especially one that involved violence. Most of the Japanese were renting houses from Koreans. There were no cases where a Japanese robbing a house from a Korean. The Japanese during those time lived a simple life. I never had bad impressions of Japanese people.”

Ming Kei Shik, a Korean man who was a student at Keijo Imperial University (a Japanese university built within Korea) testified the following:

“Personally, I had many Japanese friends and never had any bad impressions towards them. I have never seen or heard any cases where a Korean was bullied by a Japanese. Never have I heard that a Japanese robbed a Korean of their home, or they exploited their land and property. Some Koreans students were taken to the Japanese shrine for prayers, but it was not mandatory. They never said anything even if you didn’t go.”

Su Yong Kim, a movie director who directed the movie “The Revelation of love” (A Japanese-Korean co-production movie about Chizuko Tauchi, a Japanese woman who adopted 3000 Korean orphans and raised them) testifies:

“The Japanese who worked in agriculture were very hard working. They were using the newest technology and agricultural methods As for the Koreans that worked in farms that were run by the Japanese, they were paid fairly for their work. The Japanese are very polite; they will never make a Korean work unpaid.”

Man Gub Lee, who went to junior high and high school in Shinui Province, says the following:

“I was the only Korean in my class but my Japanese classmates were very kind to me. There were many great Japanese teachers as well. In 1940, was when the Koreans started to change their name to Japanese ones. However, they were not forced; even those Koreans who were working at the government offices did not get fired just because they refused to change their names. No Japanese harmed the daily lives of the Koreans. They were very careful not to go against the laws the Japanese created.”

Memory of being helped by a Korean

There is a testimony of Fusako Sakuma, who was a teacher in Shinui Province who testified:

“There were many times when I visited the homes of my Korean students. When we visited them, the whole family would come out to greet us and treated us politely. We were always grateful for their hospitality.”

Shortly after the end of the War, Ms. Sakuma was sent back to Japan. But it was before she was deported back to Japan, was when she said she was helped by a Korean.

“The internment facility was very crowded; there were 8 people living in an approximately 5 square meter room. The Korean people who worked at the facility visited us and deeply felt sympathy and cried for us. When we were finally able to get on the boat to return to Japan, the Korean people bid us farewell in tears. I will never forget the kindness that they gave us.”

Not only Ms. Sakuma, but there were many Japanese people who were treated kindly by the Korean people during this period.

Yukio Tsuboi, police official who worked at the Korean Governor’s Office (the Japanese government in Korea), built friendships with his colleagues who worked in the office that were Korean. Mr. Tsuboi testified the following:

“I enjoyed having conversations with them. I have no idea how the people who claim ‘Japanese people did terrible things’ look at the relationship I have with my Korean colleagues. If what they say the Japanese did during the War was true, I, who was head of the police, would’ve been one of the most ‘evil’ and my Korean colleagues would have never even spoken to me.”

How about the view from a Christian, about the visiting the Shinto Shrines? Masumi Kudo, who was working at the Korean Governor’s Office says the following:

“In Korea, praying at Shrines were a rare custom and many regions did not even have shrines to visit. There were debates on how to worship shrines but never it never ended up with the conclusion of forcing anyone to worship at a shrine. And this was only about a year before the end of the War. In Seoul, maybe the junior high school students visited the Shrine once a month. In Pyeongyang, there was no obligation to visit shrines.”

There were many Koreans working at the Korean Governor’s Office. Mr. Kudo also testified the following:

“The Japanese and Korean workers were completely equal and worked in the office with our desks side by side. There were cases a Japanese assistant worked under a Korean supervisor. In this situation, I have never seen any conflicts between the Japanese and Korean workers. It was not a work environment where the Japanese could act as if they were superior to the Koreans.”

Michihiro Yoshida, a student at Keijo Imperial University during the occupation era says the following:

“I was the 15th generation alumni. In my year, there were 25 Japanese students and 10 Korean students. In my class, there was Yong Seon Kim, a very good friend of mine.  Yong Seon later became a member of parliament, however, the government at the time was under the Anti-Japanese president Syng man Lee; and Yong Seon remained the opposing party throughout his who political career. He was oppressed by President Lee’s government and was imprisoned but was freed due to the plead by the Japanese prime minister Kakuei Tanaka. He later became the ambassador to Japan and lived in Japan for a while.”

The Japanese carefully obeyed the law

Mototoshi Abe, who appeared earlier in this article, also says things about the “Comfort Women”:

“It is said that the Japanese invaded the suburban areas and kidnapped women but that is impossible. First of all that would be abduction, which is a criminal offense. Even before they would be trialed under criminal law, they would be beaten up by the villagers before they could abduct the women. And if such a thing really did occur, there is no way I would have not heard of it. I have never heard such a thing, even through rumors. This issue heavily affects the honor of the Japanese who lived on the Korean peninsula during those times. The police chief was Korean and many of the judges and prosecutors were Korean. At the Korean Governor’s Office, many of the people in a management or administrative position were also Korean. They had the same rights and authority as the Japanese did. Under these circumstances, it is impossible for a major abduction of Korean women to occur without the issue being brought up. The Japanese were only 1% of the population; for their own safety, they could not do such a thing.”

Mr. Abe claims that the “Comfort Women” was something fabricated after the War. Mr. Abe also testifies the recruitment of soldiers that was done during those times:

“In 1943, Japanese students were gathered for military recruitment. The recruitment was mandatory and they were sent to the battlefield. During this time, majority of the Koreans did not have the obligation to join the army. To be honest, I was jealous of them because they didn’t have to go. I even thought, this was prejudice that only the Japanese had to go to War.

The recruitments of Koreans did not start until April of 1944. There were many Koreans that signed up voluntarily. It hurts my heart to think that there were many that died that were not volunteers.”

We have observed many testimonies, both from Japanese and Koreans. They all experienced the era of Japanese occupation. From these testimonies, we can tell that the Japanese and Koreans worked together peacefully during those times. Even at the level of common folk, the Japanese and Koreans lived together without conflicts. At the Korean Governor’s Office, both Japanese and Koreans worked in the same office with their desks side by side. It is impossible to say that there were absolutely no conflicts during the 36 years of occupation; however, compared to Taiwan, which was also occupied by Japan, they were minor and did not happen as often. Overall, one could say during the Japanese occupation, the Japanese and Koreans built a fairly good relationship and got along well. Of course, since Japan and Korea “were one”, even Koreans were recruited as soldiers or for labor and many of them died in battle. But that was the same for the Japanese; the fate of Eastern Asia was dependent on the Japanese and Koreans. That is why many Koreans volunteered in joining the battle; they wanted to fight for their country alongside the Japanese. The number of Koreans in 1942 who volunteered to become soldiers was 62 times the number they were recruiting. Many Koreans volunteered to fight alongside the Japanese. Among those who volunteered, there were some who took part in the Kamikaze attack. I was deeply moved to know that the Japanese and the Koreans share a history of living together hand in hand. Towards the end of the War, things on the Korean peninsula must have been difficult. But it was the same situation in Japan. As a matter of fact, maybe things were better on the Korean peninsula than in Japan. This is because Japan’s major cities were being air-raided by the US Air Force; Korea on the other hand, was never air-raided. And the poverty that attacked that came with the end of the War was still better than the Lee Dynasty. If Japan did not occupy Korea, the Korean peninsula would have been colonized by either China or Russia. If this happened, the Korean identity and culture would have been lost forever.

Those Korean men who volunteered for the army volunteered because they understood this. That is why they marched to the battlefield with the Japanese. Not many Koreans today know of this truth. However, I still think of this era as the “good old times” when Japanese and Koreans were living peacefully together.

Japan aided Korea in their Independence

Eventually, Japan was defeated by the Allied Forces in World War II. When the Japanese left the Korean peninsula, one man returned to Korea. His name was Sung man Lee. Until the end of the War, he was in Hawaii; he became the first President of Korea and put into office by the United States. He was originally Anti-Japanese and fled to Hawaii when the Japanese came to the Korean peninsula. Since he was in America, he has never experienced the Japanese occupation. He did not know what life was like during the annexation. When he came into office, he quickly exiled any Koreans that were pro-Japanese and created a Korea where you had to be Anti-Japanese.

Inside the household, schools, even at work, anything positive towards Japanese was banned only insults was permitted. Fake history that was fabricated began to be taught at school and children from that time received extreme Anti-Japanism. This is how Anti-Japanese Korea was built. Even today, there is no freedom of speech within both North and South Korea. And there is also no objective history education. At the very least, the Japanese should know their own true history of their grandparents and ancestors. Why did Japan occupy the Korean peninsula in the first place?

The major reason was that Korea was in a state of bankruptcy. Japan’s occupation of Korea was to rescue the nation. This is like providing welfare to a family that cannot survive. It was a like a Daily Life Security Act where the citizens of a country are protected until they are able to live independently, and also provide them a job to sustain their lives. What Japan did during this time was they protected the daily lives of the Korean people.

This occupation was done through an agreement between Japan and Korea. The international community also agreed and approved this. And Japan played a very large role in the independence of Korea. Japan never did anything to be held grudge for. It was similar to a corporation annexing another in order to save that corporation from being bankrupt. Not only did Japan support Korea economically, but sent human resources from Japan to help in the development of technology and business management. Mitsutoyo Arimura, who was head of the Japanese-run bank in Korea used to say,“We must help this nation to become strong and independent, then return it to its people” his son, Toshihiko says. Mitsutoyo’s belief was to support Korea economically and lead it to its indepence. This was a common belief among many Japanese who lived and worked in Korea during those times. Man Gub Lee, a Korean student at the time says the following:

“There was a Japanese teacher at my school named Mr. Uemura. He used to say to us ‘what Korea needs to become independent is economic power’.” Many Japanese in Korea at this time were working so that Korea can gain economic power and become an independent nation.

The True Path to the Japanese-Korean Friendship

Of course, the Japanese occupation was not perfect. There were many errors and policies that did not work out. And there were minor groups of Japanese that did bad things. It is hard to say that there were not any Japanese who acted as if they will superior because they were Japanese. There also were Koreans that did bad things as well. However, overall, the Japanese and Koreans lived together peacefully during the occupation. If one focuses on the small details, there may have been a few minor conflicts, but we must not let those minor conflicts speak for the whole.

I have spoken about the past throughout this article because knowing the truth of the past is essential for the beliefs in our daily lives today. Many people say that the “Japanese were evil”. This was what was taught even at church. We were forced to believe that that was the truth. That is why we must listen to the people who were actually there and experienced those times. It is also stated in the bible,

“Remember the days of old; consider the generations long past. Ask your father and he will tell you, your elders, and they will explain to you” (Deuteronomy 32:7)

This is a verse said by Moses towards the people of Israel. At this time the Israeli left Egypt and were wandering through the Sinai peninsula and camping outside. Their lives were not easy; however, it was much better compared to lives they had as slaves in Egypt. A Israeli complained to Moses, “at least in Egypt we were able to eat”, “Moses made us leave prosperous Egypt and brought us out here to die. He has done nothing but bad to us.” The Israeli people started to criticize Moses. However, Moses responded:

“ Remember the days of old; consider the generations long past. Ask your father and he will tell you, your elders, and they will explain to you”

Do not get confused by rumors. Listen to your elders and ancestors who have the knowledge through experience. He said that it is important to listen to them and that way, you will learn the truth.

Knowing the truth is crucial to one’s daily belief. The biased, fabricated view of claiming that the Japanese were evil, is preventing Japan from its revival.

Article by Arimasa Kubo, Christian pastor and non-fiction writer

日韓併合時代の真実

かつて日本と朝鮮が手を取り合って、仲良く生きていた時代があった

親から聞かされた「日本人は親切だった」

 日本には今日、悲しい風説が飛び交い、それによって多くの人々が惑わされています。たとえば、
 「日本はかつて朝鮮を侵略し、朝鮮の人たちを弾圧し、虐待し、搾取し、ひどいことをした」
 といった類の風説です。学校でも習ったでしょう。あたかも事実であるかのように。
 日本は悪者だ、と教え込まれてきたのです。しかし、こうした主張が本当なのか、それとも事実とは違うのか、私たちは、当時の実体験を持つ長老たちに聞かなければなりません。
 韓国人の女性で、呉善花(お・そんふぁ)さんというかたがいます。日韓関係についてたくさんの本を書いているかたですが、彼女は小さい頃、親の世代から「日本人はとても親切な人たちだった」と聞かされていました。


 ところが、学校に入学すると、先生から、「日本人は韓国人にひどいことをした」と教わって、すさまじいばかりの反日教育を受けたのです。それでいつしか、学校で教えられるままに、「日本人は韓国人にひどいことをした」という認識が、彼女の中で常識となっていました。
 彼女はその後日本に渡って、日本で生活するようになりました。すると、かつて親から教えられた「日本人はとても親切な人たちだった」という言葉が、再びよみがえってきたのです。

 それで彼女は、日本と韓国の歴史について、もう一度勉強し直しました。やがて彼女は、韓国で受けた反日教育というものが、非常に偏った、間違いだらけのものであることを知るようになります。そして、反日主義から抜け出したのです。
 彼女はのちに、『生活者の日本統治時代』(三交社)という本を出版しました。これは、かつて日本が朝鮮を統治した時代――つまり日韓併合の時代(一九一〇~一九四五年)を実際に体験した日本人や韓国人にインタビューして、それをまとめたものです。


 そこには、日本統治下の朝鮮を実際に体験した日韓一五人の証言が書かれています。いずれも、今はかなりお年をめされた方々ばかりです。
 彼らは貴重な証言を残してくれました。彼らの体験談を通し、あの朝鮮における日本統治時代は実際はどんなものだったか、ということが非常にはっきり見えてきます。
  私たちは彼らの証言に耳を傾けてみましょう。


日本統治下の朝鮮を体験した人々の証言

 たとえば阿部元俊さんは、大正九年、三歳のときに朝鮮に渡り、そこで学生時代を過ごした人です。文字通り、日本統治下の朝鮮を体験したのですが、彼はこう言っています。
 「私が朝鮮にいたころ、日本人による朝鮮人いじめの話は、噂としてもまず聞いたことがありません。とくに、ソウル郊外の水原にいたころは、日本人が少ないからと珍しがられて、地域の人たちはみな親切にしてくれていましたしね。
 少なくとも水原では、私の知る限り、日本人と朝鮮人とが衝突したとか、喧嘩したとか、何かのトラブルがあったといった話は聞いたことがありません。……ソウルでもそうでした。……学校では、
 『ここは朝鮮だ、我々は他人の国によそからやって来て住んでいる。朝鮮人と喧嘩したり、朝鮮人をいじめたりは絶対にしてはいけない
 と盛んに言われていましたし、親からも厳しくそう言われていました。……
 私の父は医者で、貧困な農民たちの治療に励んでいましたが、それで病原菌をもらってしまいまして、腸チフスと赤痢にかかってしまいました。父が病院を辞めるときには、多くの朝鮮人が家にやって来て、『どうか辞めないで、ここにいてください』と泣いて別れを惜しんでいました。……
 戦後、日本に帰ってから、朝鮮に住んでいた日本人は朝鮮人をさかんに苦しめたという言葉を、当然のようにぶつけられましたが、自分の体験からすると、いったいそれはどういうことなのか、どう考えてもわかりません。
 喧嘩ということだけでなくて、問題になるようないじめとか、差別とか、一般生活者の間ではほとんどなかったということを、私は自分自身の実体験から自信をもって言うことができます」

 このように阿部さんは、一般庶民のレベルでは朝鮮人と日本人は仲良くやっていたと、証言しています。今日、韓国の学校教育では、
 「日帝は、全国いたるところで韓民族に対する徹底的な弾圧と搾取を行ない、支配体制の確立に力を注いだ」
 「日帝の弾圧に苦しめられたわが韓民族は、光復(戦後の解放)を得るまでの間、植民地政策に対して自主救国運動を展開した」
 等と教えられています。このようなことを教えられると、日本人はまるで朝鮮でヤクザのようにふるまい、日本人は朝鮮人を虐待し、両者は至る所で非常に仲が悪かったような感じですね。しかし、実際に朝鮮における日本統治時代を体験した人々に聞くと、まったく違う様子だったのです。

 たとえば、生まれも育ちも朝鮮の新義州(今日の北朝鮮北部)という林健一さんも、こう語っています。
 「日本人による朝鮮人差別ということは、まったくありませんでした。学校で生徒同士は完全に対等で、上級生の朝鮮人が下級生の日本人を呼び寄せて、『お前は服装がなっていない』とか説教することなんかがたびたびありましたね。……
 朝鮮を出て、日本の内地に行きたいとも思いませんでした。朝鮮の人々はよかったですし、私も居心地がよかったですから。……骨をどこに埋めるかと聞かれれば、『朝鮮』と答えたものです」

 また、日本統治下のソウルで青春時代を過ごした吉田多江さんは、こう語ります。
 「近所の子どもたちともよく遊びました。私は朝鮮の女の子たちの長く束ねた髪の毛がうらやましくて、私がさわりたいと言うと、よく触らせてくれました。……何の区別もなくつき合っていました。……
 仲のよかった思い出がいっぱいで、朝鮮人と日本人の間でいじめたりいじめられたりといったことは、本当に見たことも聞いたこともありません。……朝鮮はとても治安がよくて、日本人を襲う泥棒や強盗の話など聞いたこともありません。……横暴なふるまいなど一切ありませんでした。
 戦後になって日本に送還されるときも、家財道具を盗られるなんてこともなく、こちらから知り合いの人たちにあげましたし、彼らはみな喜んで感謝の礼を表してくれました。こんな素晴らしいことって、あるでしょうか。世界に誇れることだと思います。……
 創氏改名(日本人名を名乗ること)を強制的にさせたとも言われますが、私のまわりの朝鮮人はみな終戦までずっと朝鮮名のままでした。
 戦後の韓国で言われてきた歴史には、あまりに嘘が多いと思います。……私はソウルで生まれ、成年になるまでソウルで生きてきましたが、日本人と韓国人が基本的に仲良く生きてきたことは、双方の民族にとって誇るべきことだと思っています」


朝鮮人と日本人は仲良く生きていた

 また同じく、日本による朝鮮統治時代を体験した韓国人の朴承復さんも、こう語っています。
 「学校では日本人生徒たちからも先生からも、差別されたことはありませんでした。……今でも日本人の同期生たちと会うと、彼らは韓国語で話したがります。……今なおそれほど親しくつき合っている日本人の同期生が何人もいます。
 商業学校の恩師二人は、とても尊敬できる方でした。一人は松尾先生で、国語の先生でした。この先生は韓国人、日本人にかかわりなく尊敬されていました。……
 もう一人は横尾先生です。この先生は日本人生徒たちからは嫌われていました。めちゃめちゃに厳しくて、過ちを犯せば決して許さない方でした。しかし、私はなぜか特別に可愛がってもらいました。いろいろな相談にものっていただいた大恩師です。
 卒業後、朝鮮殖産銀行に務めましたが、差別的な扱いを受けたことは全くありません。……行員家族全員で地方の温泉地へ一泊旅行に行ったりもしました。日本人も韓国人も区別なく、みんな仲良く楽しく遊んで過ごしました。
 日帝時代にそんなことあり得ないと言われるかもしれませんが、過激な人や極端な人たちの一部での喧嘩や衝突はあっても、一般の日本人と韓国人のぶつかり合いなんか、見たこともありません。…
 多くの日本人は、朝鮮人から家をちゃんと借りて住んでいました。日本人が勝手に韓国人の家を奪い取るなど、そんなことはなかったです。当時の日本人は本当に質素でした。……私自身は当時の日本人に対して悪い印象は全く持っていませんでした」

 また、ソウルの京城帝国大学で学んだ韓国人の閔圭植さんは、こう語っています。
 「私は個人的には日本人と仲がよくて、悪い感情はありませんでした。日本人が韓国人に恐怖を与えたとか、韓国人が日本人に殴られたとか、何か嫌がらせをやられたとかいったことは、個人的には見たことも聞いたこともありません。……
 日本人が韓国人の家を奪って勝手に使うとか、土地や財産を搾取するとかいうことも、まったくありませんでした。神社参拝については、何かの日には学生全部が連れて行かれました。行かなくても別に厳しい文句は言われませんでしたが」

 また、日韓共同映画『愛の黙示録』を作り、三〇〇〇人の韓国人孤児を育てた日本人・田内千鶴子さんの生涯を描いた監督・金洙容さんも、こう語っています。
 「農場の日本人たちはとても勤勉でした。日本人は早くから科学的で先進的な農法を使っていました。……日本人の経営する農場には、韓国人たちもたくさん働いていました。日本人は日当をきちんと計算して渡してくれました。彼らはとても礼儀正しく、日当を支払わないようなことはまずしません

 また、新義州の中学や高校に通っていた李萬甲さんは、こう語っています。
 「朝鮮人は私一人でしたが、日本人の同級生みんなに親切にしてもらいました。……日本人の先生には立派な方がいらっしゃいました。……
 創氏改名は昭和一五年からのことでした。ほとんどの人が変えていましたね。……しかし、官庁に務める人でも、変えないからといって首になるようなことはありませんでした。……
 日本人が韓国人の生活を侵害するとか、略奪するとか、そんな類のことは日本人は全くしませんでした。日本人は法に反することをしないようにと、非常に気をつけていました

日本人も朝鮮人も協力しあって働いていた

朝鮮人に助けられた思い出

 さらに、新義州の朝鮮人学校で教鞭をとっていた佐久間房子さんは、こう語ります。
 「朝鮮人家庭を訪問することはかなり多かったです。招待を受けて他の先生たちと一緒に行きますと、家族全員が出てきて丁寧にお辞儀をしてくれます。その丁重な歓待ぶりには、いつもこちらは恐縮するばかりです」
 この佐久間さんは、戦後、日本へ送還されるとき、朝鮮人に助けられた経験があるといいます。
 「収容所の三畳ほどの部屋に八人で暮らしていましたが、何かのおりに朝鮮人の元従業員たちが来てくれて、そのたびに『こんな狭いところで生活しているなんて、かわいそうだ』と涙を流してくれるんです。……
 やがて送還船に乗ることができました。送還のときには、下に住んでいた朝鮮人たちが泣きながら見送ってくれました。……あの人たちの命をかけた好意は一生忘れることはできません」
 このように朝鮮人に助けられた、親切にされたという日本人も、非常に多かったのです。

 また、朝鮮総督府(日本による朝鮮統治の中心)の警察幹部だった坪井幸生さんは、かつて朝鮮で共に働いていた多くの朝鮮人と、深い友情を持ち続けているといいます。坪井さんはこう言っています。
 「彼らとは今も、本当によい気分で話ができるのです。こういう私たちの関係を、『日本は悪いことをした』式の見方をする人たちは、どうみるのでしょうか。日帝時代に、日本が朝鮮に対して悪いことをしたのであれば、警察部長をやっていた私などは、その悪の最大のものと言われるでしょう。そうであれば、彼らがつき合ったりするはずがありません」

 私たちクリスチャンが気になる神社参拝については、どうでしょうか。昭和一八年から朝鮮総督府で働いていた工藤真澄さんは、こう語っています。
 「朝鮮では神社数が圧倒的に少なくて、神社のない地域がたくさんあるわけです。学務課では、参拝するのかどうかについて議論されていましたが、強制へ向けて動くというのうようなことはありませんでした。
 いずれにしても、終戦直前の一年ほどの間のことです。その一年間、ソウルでは朝鮮神宮に中学生以上が月に一度、参拝するようにしていたかもしれません。平壌では、神社参拝を義務にしたり強制したりしたことはありません」
 また、朝鮮総督府には、朝鮮人の職員も多かったといいます。工藤さんはこう語っています。
 「朝鮮人とは同じ役人として一緒にすわって仕事をしていましたし、朝鮮人課長の下に日本人課長補佐がいることもありました。そういうなかで、とくに日本人と朝鮮人がぶつかり合うようなことは見たことも聞いたこともありません。……日本人が特権的に振る舞える条件など全くありませんでした」

 また日本統治時代、ソウルの京城帝国大学で学んだ吉田道弘さんは、こう語ります。
 「私は第一五回の卒業生で、予科のときのクラスには日本人が二五人、朝鮮人が一〇人いました。同級生の一人に金永善がいました。彼とはとくに仲がよかったです。……
 金永善は戦後、国会議員になりましたが、李承晩政権の反日政策に反発して、野党にあり続けました。彼は与党政権から弾圧を受けて、監獄にまで入れられたんですが、田中総理がお願いして出ることができました。彼はのちに駐日大使となって、日本に派遣されました」

 
日本人は不法なことをしないよう気づかっていた

 さらに、一番始めに述べました阿部元俊さんは、従軍慰安婦問題に関する質問に、こう答えています。
 「日本人が朝鮮の田舎に行って、若い娘たちを奪ってきたと言われますね。そんなことはあり得ないです。もしそんなことをしたら誘拐犯ですし、懲役刑を受けることになります。いや、法律の問題以前に、村の人たちにめちゃめちゃにやられてしまいますよ。……
 またそんなことがあれば、必ず私の耳にも入ってきたはずです。でも、そんな話も噂も一度も聞いたことがありません。これはね、当時朝鮮に住んでいた日本人の名誉にもかかわることです。……
 警察署長も朝鮮人でしたし、裁判所の判事、検事などにも朝鮮人がいました。朝鮮総督府では、局長、部長、課長にも朝鮮人がいました。もちろん警察官は、朝鮮人だろうと日本人だろうと同じ権限を持っていました。
 そういう状況下で女狩りが堂々と行なわれ、一人として問題にする者がいなかったなんて、あり得ないことです。全人口の一%にすぎない日本人が、そんなに悪いことをして安全に生きられたわけがないんです」
 阿部さんは、従軍慰安婦問題というのは、戦後になされた歴史捏造にすぎないと断言しているわけです。阿部さんはまた、戦時中の徴兵についてはこう語りました。
 「昭和一八年に、学徒動員となり、日本人学生たちは強制的に呼び出されて戦地に向かいました。……そんなときでも、大部分の朝鮮人は戦地に行く必要がありませんでした。正直な話、朝鮮人がうらやましかったですよ。『これは差別じゃないか』と言ったりもしたもんです。
 朝鮮人までが徴兵されるようになったのは、昭和一九年四月からのことでした。……自ら志願して戦地に行った朝鮮人たちもたくさんいました。……しかし志願ではなく戦死した人たちもいますし、……それを思うと本当に心が痛みます」

 以上、いろいろな方の証言をみてきました。いずれも、日本統治下の朝鮮を実体験された方々です。
 これらの証言からみえてくるものは、かつて日本人と朝鮮人が手を取り合って生きていた時代があった、ということです。庶民レベルでもごく普通に仲良くつき合っていました。また朝鮮総督府内でさえ、机を並べて日本人と朝鮮人が共に働いていたのです。
 日本が朝鮮を支配した三六年間において、両者の間に若干の衝突事件はありました。しかしそれらはきわめて散発的なものでした。規模も小さいものでした。日本統治下の台湾に比べれば、朝鮮の反日運動はきわめて少なかったのです。
 全体的にみれば、日本統治下の朝鮮において、日本人と朝鮮人の間には良好な関係が築かれていました。もちろん当時、日本と朝鮮は一体でしたから、戦争末期には朝鮮国内でも徴兵や徴用(労働に呼ばれること)が行なわれ、苦痛を感じた者たちも多くいました。
 しかし、それは日本人も同じだったのです。日本と朝鮮は運命共同体になっていました。
 だからこそ、朝鮮で徴兵制が敷かれる以前にも、朝鮮人の中には自ら志願して兵士となり、日本人と一緒に敵と戦おうという人たちが少なくなかったのです。その朝鮮人志願兵の倍率は、昭和一七年にはなんと採用数の六二倍にも達し、非常に狭き門でした。
 それほど多くの朝鮮人が、志願してまでも日本人と共に戦いたいと願ったのです。彼らの中には特攻隊の隊員となって散っていった人々もいました。このように朝鮮の人々と日本人が共に生きていた時代が過去にあったことを思うと、私は感無量の思いです。
 戦争末期の朝鮮は、たしかに苦しい時ではあったでしょう。しかし、日本の内地も同じでした。いや実際は、日本の内地より朝鮮のほうがはるかに恵まれていたのです。
 なぜなら日本の内地は、アメリカ軍の爆撃を受けて多くの都市が破壊されました。しかし朝鮮は、そうした攻撃を一切受けなかったからです。また、戦争末期の朝鮮の物資欠乏や苦しみでさえも、かつての李朝時代の朝鮮の悲惨さに比べれば、はるかに恵まれたものでした。
 また日本の統治がなければ、朝鮮半島は二〇世紀前半までにロシアか中国の領土となっていたでしょう。そして朝鮮民族も、朝鮮文化も消滅していたに違いないのです。
 志願兵となった朝鮮人兵士らは、そのことを理解したからこそ、日本人たちと共に戦地に赴いたのです。そうした事実を、今の韓国人はほとんど知りません。しかし私は、これは日本と朝鮮が手をたずさえ合って生きた「古き良き時代」といってもいいとさえ思っています。


朝鮮のひとり立ちを助けた日本

 やがて日本が敗戦を迎え、朝鮮から日本人たちがみな去っていったとき、ひとりの人が韓国へ戻ってきました。彼の名は李承晩(イ・スンマン)。彼は、それまでハワイにいましたが、アメリカから韓国初代大統領の座を与えられ、韓国を支配するようになりました。
 もともと熱烈な反日主義者だった李承晩は、日韓併合時代中、ずっとアメリカに亡命していましたので、朝鮮における日本統治を体験していません。彼は日本統治を知らない。その彼が、韓国初代大統領の地位につくと、親日派の人々をすべて追放し、もはや反日でなければ韓国では生きられないようにしました。


 家庭でも学校でも職場でも、親日的発言はすべて禁止され、日本の悪口だけが許されるようになりました。虚偽と捏造によりゆがめられた歴史観が学校で教え込まれ、少年少女は、すさまじい反日教育の中で育てられていったたのです。
 そうやって、今日の韓国の反日主義が形成されました。北朝鮮の金日成の場合も同様です。今も北朝鮮、および韓国には言論の自由はありません。そして客観的な歴史教育もないのです。
 しかし少なくとも日本人は、自分の親や、おじいさんやおばあさんの世代の歴史をきちんと知っておく必要があります。日本はなぜ朝鮮を統治したのでしょうか。
 それはごく簡単にいえば、当時の朝鮮は、国家的な破産状態にあったからです。日本はその朝鮮に、助け舟を出したのです。
 これはちょうど、生活力を失った家庭に、国が生活保護を適用することにも似ていました。生活保護法では、その家庭がひとり立ちできるまで、国が保護を加え、援助をしていきます。また職員が生活や仕事に至るまで、事細かに指導していきます。
 同様に、かつて日本は朝鮮をひとり立ちできる国家にするために、朝鮮を統治していったのです。
 これは、朝鮮と日本との間の国際的合意のもとで行なわれたことでした。また、当時の世界の多くの国々が賛成し、承認したものでした。
 そして日本は、実際に朝鮮をひとり立ちできるまでに建て直したのです。恨まれるようなことをやったわけではありません。
 また、日本が朝鮮を統治したのは、ちょうどある会社が、破産状態にあった別の会社を吸収合併して建て直すことにも似ていました。いわば日本株式会社が、破産した朝鮮株式会社を吸収合併して建て直したのです。


 こうした吸収合併の際、日本株式会社は、朝鮮株式会社を経済的に支えるだけでなく、様々な人材を送り込んで技術や経営の指導にあたります。そうやって会社を建て直していくのです。それと同様のことが、朝鮮の国家再建においても行なわれました。
 実際、たとえば朝鮮殖産銀行の頭取として働いていた有賀光豊さんも、ふだんから、
 「朝鮮は、我々がお手伝いして立派な国に育て上げ、そのうえで本来の持ち主に返すべきだ
 という信念で働いていました。息子の敏彦さんがそう述べています。朝鮮に経済的な自立をもたらし、やがてひとり立ちできるようになったら、独立国へ導いていこうと彼は願っていました。
 これは、当時朝鮮で働いていた多くの日本人たちの共通意識だったのです。韓国人の李萬甲さんも、日本統治時代を振り返ってこう語っています。
 「私が通っていた高等学校には、上村先生という日本人の先生がいらっしゃって、立派な方でした。先生は、韓国人の生徒たちが集まっている場で、よく言ってくださった言葉があります。それは、
 『君たちが独立するためには経済の力だ
 という言葉でした」
 このように日本人は、朝鮮が力をつけて、やがて独立国家となれるよう、自立させるために働いていたのです。


真の日韓友好への道

 もちろん、日本の統治が完全だったというわけではありません。失策や失政もありました。また日本人の中には悪い人たちもいました。内地から来たといって威張っていた日本人もいなかったわけではありません。一方、朝鮮人の中にも悪い人たちもいました。
 しかし全般的にみれば、当時日本人と朝鮮人とは仲良く共に手を取り合って生きていたのです。もし歴史を虫メガネでみれば、小さな部分には、汚れもあったでしょう。けれども、私たちは全体的な姿にあらわれた良い事柄を決して忘れてはいけないのです。


 なぜ私は、こうした過去のことを長々と語ってきたのでしょうか。それは、過去について真実を知ることが、私たちの信仰生活にとっても、きわめて大切だからです。
 多くの人々が、「日本人は悪者だった」と言ってきました。教会でもそれが語られてきました。それを聞かされた私たちも、なんとなくそれを信じ込まされてきました。しかし、上に述べたように、実際にそれを体験した人々の証言によく耳を傾けることが非常に重要です。
 聖書の中にも、こう記されています。

 「昔の日々を思い出し、代々の年を思え。あなたの父に問え。彼はあなたに告げ知らせよう。長老たちに問え。彼らはあなたに話してくれよう。』」(申命記三二章七節)

 この箇所は、指導者モーセが、イスラエル民族に向かって語ったものです。
 イスラエル民族は、すでに出エジプトをし、シナイ半島の荒野を放浪していました。荒野の各地で宿営し、キャンプ生活をしていました。その生活は、決して楽なものではなく、辛いものだった。エジプトでの奴隷生活に比べれば、それははるかに良いものだったのに、ある人々は不平をこぼしていいました。
 「エジプトでは少なくとも、もっとおいしい物を食べられた。肉鍋もあったし、パンも腹一杯食べられた」
 また、こういう人々もいました。
 「モーセは、あの繁栄したエジプトから我々を連れだして、こんな荒野でのたれ死にさせようとしている。モーセは我々に悪を行なったのだ」
 彼らは、モーセは悪者だと非難したのです。しかしそのとき、モーセは皆の前に立って言ったのです。
 「あなたの父に問え。彼はあなたに告げ知らせよう。長老たちに問え。彼らはあなたに話してくれよう
 と。あなたがたは風説に惑わされてはならない。当時の実体験を持つあなたがたの父や、長老たちに話を聞きなさいと。彼らの数は今では少なくなったけれども、彼らの言う言葉に耳を傾けることが大切だと言いました。そのときに真実がわかるからです。
 真実に立つことは、信仰生活の基盤です。日本人は悪者だ、という偏った見方、間違った罪責感は、日本のリバイバル(信仰の覚醒)の妨げになることを、どうか知ってください。

著者

久保有政

聖書解説者、古代史家、現代史家、ノンフィクション・ライター、サイエンス・ライター、ユダヤ文化研究家

1955年神戸生まれ。東京聖書学院卒。

池袋キリスト教教会牧師。レムナント出版代表。

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *